Remembering missing memorials


Heidi Macintosh says a logbooklabelled inside “Secondary Day School”, belonged to the Higher Grade School in Newhampton Road, opened in 1894 with elementary and higher sections. The higher section provided 3 – 4 years of education above the Standards including science. There was also a cookery centre. In 1907 the word Municipal was added. In 1921 the Higher Grade moved to Old Hall Street to be the Intermediate school.

The covering dates of the log book are 1902 to 1921 and, in contrast to many of the other school log books already featured, there is quite a bit of detail about the War, in particular deaths of former pupils. On 3 September 1914, the head speaks to children about the War and directs “that for the next week or two every class should study the geography of the war.”

On 18 May 1916: Received an account of the heroic self sacrifice of Sergeant Thomas Pearson (Sedgley) of the Shropshire Light Infantry an “Old Boy” who gave his helmet to a private who was buried in a dug-out (all but his head). Sergeant Pearson was overcome by the poison gas & taken to Hospital – where he died.”

On 10 July 1916, he notes  “death of Sergeant John L. Tuft – write to bereaved parents of this ‘old boy’”. On 20 November 1914: This morning after prayers read of the decoration of Sergeant Sidney Jenkins, formerly a pupil her, by the French President with the Medaille Militaire, for gallantry; announcement received with acclamation by scholars.

Wrote to Sergeant Jenkins conveying him our hearty congratulations.

On 7 December 19

Sergeant Jenkins of the Royal Flying Corps, with his decoration, spoke to the Scholas who received him with acclamation; he spoke of it as being the proudest day in his life to be in his old school & to receive the congratulations of teachers & scholars.

On 6 June 1916, he

Read in last night’s ‘Express & Star’ that Nurse Bertha Mary Cooksley, an old scholar of this school, a staff sister at the 1st Southern General Hospital has been awarded the decoration of the Royal Red Cross in recognition of her services in connection with the war.”

On 7 October 1914,“Robert Hall an old pupil who has joined the Territorials, called to see me.” Regular updates on the War are given to the present pupils, including on 23 March 1916:

Read to scholars the account of Sergeant C. H. Nott who tho’ wounded in the right eye by a piece of shrapnel & rendered unconscious, after coming to himself, sighted his gun & brought down a German aeroplane, & forced another to take to flight.

He was taken to Boulogne Hospital & treated – having unfortunately lost the sight of his right eye.

Write to Sergeant Nott at Chelsea Hospital, London.”

It is not clear whether Sergeant Nott is also a former pupil.

Tom Henry Walter

Tom was born in Wolverhampton in 1891, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Walters. He first attended the Wesleyan Schools, then moved to the Higher Grade and later the local Centre School, before attending the Wesleyan Training College in Westminster, London. They were living at 2 Alexandra Street, Wolverhampton, in 1901, along with Tom’s sisters, Florence, Gertrude, Elsie and Ruby. They had moved to Dalton Street by 1911, and Tom had an additional two sisters, Nelly and Dorothy. Tom passed his examination, and became a teacher at Dudley Road Schools under the Wolverhampton Education Committee.

Along with about 25 fellow teachers, Tom enlisted in the armt, joining the 1st/6th Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 2820). He first served in France on 25 June 1915. He was wounded in battle and was sent home to recuperate, but was drafted for service again on 16 March 1916. He was wounded again, but died of these wounds on 2 July 1916. An article about his death appeared in the Midland Counties Express on 16 December 1916. He is buried at the Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, Saulty, France, and is remembered on the Higher Grade School memorial

Harold Vincent Yates

Harold was born in Wolverhampton in 1887 to Adam and Ellen Elizabeth Yates. The family were living at 9 Clarendon Street, Wolverhampton in 1901, and consisted of Harold, his parents, and siblings Edith W., Lucy E., Hilda J., Edward C., John D., James L., and Robert H. Harold attended the Higher Grade School in Wolverhampton.

Harold enlisted first with the Territorial Regiment, before becoming Clerk-Corporal in the 20th Hussars (service number 2911). He was killed in action at the age of 25 on 30 October 1914. His address when he died was Shirley, Fallings Park. He was featured in the Midland Counties Express on 16 December 1916, and is listed on the Roll of Honour of the Higher Grade School. He is remembered at the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, as well as on the memorial at Heath Park.

Randolph Townsend Delany

 

Randolph was born in Bilston in 1886, the son of Walter Hugh and Annie Maria Delany. Randolph attended the Higher Grade School. In 1901 they were living at 94 Church Street, Bilston, along with Randolph’s siblings Alice Blanche Constance, Hugh Douglas, Walter Harry, Margery Mansell, Dorothy Philomena and Kathleen Mary. Randolph was a commercial clerk. In about 1904 he enlisted with the South Staffordshire Regiment (service number 6746), being promoted to Lance Corporal after three weeks. He served twice in South Africa. He became a sergeant-major. By 1911, the family were living at 94 Market Place, Church Street, Bilston, and Randolph was a merchant in the motor trade.

When war broke out, he volunteered and rejoined his regiment, in the 2nd Battalion, first entering the war on 12 August 1914. He took part in at least 16 engagements. In the course of these, he participated in hand-to-hand combat with the bayonet, and on one occasion a bullet went through his hat and another through his sleeve. He survived all unscathed. However, on 10 March 1915, he was killed in action at Givenchy. He was featured in the Midland Counties Express on 16 December 1916. He is remembered at the memorial at Le Touret, and appears on the Bilston Town Hall Ward Roll of Honour, as well as on the Roll of Honour for the Higher Grade School

Bertram Cartwright 

The brother of Horace, Bertram was born in Wolverhampton in 1891, the son of Edward B. and Elizabeth Cartwright. Bertram attended the Higher Grade School, and by 1911, he had become a tailor

On 5 August 1914, he enlisted with the 9th Battalion of the Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) (service number 1852). By this date, his trade was given as Salesman (draper), and he was living at 14 Rose Street, Edinburgh. According to the Midland Counties Express of 16 December 1916, he had “a very thrilling time in the fighting”. On 3 July 1916, he was killed by a shell while sleeping. He is remembered at the Arras Memorial

Donald Horace Starkey 

Donald was born in Wolverhampton in 1897, the son of Horace Joseph Alfred and Emma Starkey. Donald attended the Willenhall Road Council School, and later the Higher Grade School in Wolverhampton, and the family lived in Willenhall. Donald worked as a junior clerk in the offices of Frank Harrison, Clerk to the Wolverhampton Board of Guardians.

As soon as he was old enough he tried to enlist, but was initially rejected. On 10 December 1915, he enlisted in the 1st Battalion of the Honourable Artillery Company (service number 7407), bu which date his address was 22 Clark Road, Wolverhampton and his trade was stamper. On 18 April 1917, he was killed in action in the Battle of Arras. Donald was featured in the Midland Counties Express on 12 May 1917

Following his death, his effects were sent home to his father, as follows:

Ernest West

Ernest was born in Wolverhampton in 1895, the son of Jesse (the principal of the Higher Grade School) and Sarah Elizabeth West. In 1901 they were living at 25 Larches Lane, Wolverhampton, together with Ernest’s sister, Jessie. By 1911, they were living at Glengarry, Coalway Road, Penn Fields, Wolverhampton, with an additional son, Harold Edgoose.

On 8 November 1915, Ernest enlisted in the 626 Company of the Motor Transport section of the Royal Army Service Corps (service number 137774). His trade was given as motor tester. He suffered from various bouts of malaria, but recovered. It was when he was on probation with the Royal Air Force as a Cadet that he died on 18 December 1918 at the British base in hospital in Mombasa, East Africa, of Blackwater Fever. He is buried at Mombasa (Mbaraki) Cemetery in Kenya, and remembered on the roll of honour of Darlington Street Methodist Church, St Phillip’s Memorial in Penn, and the Higher Grade School.

Daniel Sampson Onions

Daniel was born in Bridgnorth in 1897, the son of Samuel Thomas and Phoebe Onions. By 1901, they were living at 9 Beacon Street, Sedgley, with Daniel’s brothers James Beaconsfield, John Arthur Balfour, Samuel Thomas, Charles Henry and George Frederick. By 1911 they were at 152 Caledonian Street, Wolverhampton, and Daniel had two additional siblings, Phoebe Sarah and Joseph Edwin. Daniel attended the Higher Grade and Technical Schools in Wolverhampton.

On 22 June 1915, he enlisted with the Royal Engineers (service number 103777). He became a Wireless Operator Learner, and was later a Pioneer and then a Sapper. By June 1915, his trade was clerk. He qualified as a Proficient Telegraphist on 19 May 1916. He served both at home and with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force with the Wireless Section at Giza. On 9 February 1918 he was sent home from hospital as being no longer physically fit for war service following sickness, and was discharged on 2 March 1918. On 16 February 1918 he was issued with a Silver War Badge (number 336114).

Daniel married Alice Lawley in Aston in 1918, and the couple had four sons – Raymond (1919 in Aston), Kenneth (1921), Maurice G. (1923) and Malcolm S. (1931) – the latter three being born in Wolverhampton. Daniel died at St George’s Hospital, Stafford, on 29 July 1965, by which date his address was 6 Vauxhall House, Vauxhall Avenue, Wolverhampton. The value of his effects was £289.

Percy Cartwright 

Percy was born in Wolverhampton in 1894, the son of Henry and Mary Cartwright. In 1901 they were living at 7 Shrubbery Street, along with Percy’s brother, John Henry. They were at the same address in 1911, by which date Percy was a van boy for an iron and tube manufacturer.

Percy’s name appears on the Roll of Honour of the Higher Grade School, indicating that he did serve, and gave his life, during the First World War. However, I have been unable to confirm details of his military service or death, so if anybody has any further information, we would love to hear it.

James William Darby 

James was born in Sedgley in about 1897, the son of Josiah and Sarah Ann Darby. In 1901, they were living at 14 Manor Road, Sedgley. By 1911, they were at Pinfold Lane, Merry Hill, Penn, and James had gained two siblings – Walter Jeavons and Mary Crossland.

James enlisted at Birmingham in the 1st/8th Territorial Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (service number 2881). He was killed in action on 1 July 1916. He is commemorated at the Thiepval memorial, as well as on the Bradley Memorial, and the memorial for Wolverhampton Higher Grade School

Arthur Banting

Arthur was born in Wolverhampton in 1895, the son of Robert and Elizabeth Banting. In 1901, they were living at 77 Gorsebrook Road, Wolverhampton, along with Arthur’s siblings Clara A., Thomas William, Rose H., Gertrude E., Edith Alice, and Frederick Charles. By 1911, they were living at 265 Dunstall Road, Wolverhampton, and there were an additional three siblings – Elizabeth Caroline, John Gill and Evelyn Daisy. Arthur now worked in an office at a nut and bolt manufacturer.

In 1917, Arthur enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps (service number 82914). However, unlike his brothers, he survived the war. His name appears on the roll of honour of the Higher Grade School, but it is possible that his initials were put on, instead of one of his brothers

Arthur married Margaret Lee in Christchurch in 1921, and the couple had three children – Peter A. (1923), Michael R. (1929) and Margaret E. (1931). Arthur died in Wolverhampton in 1958.

Charles was born in Worcester in 1898, the son of George and Alice Emmeline Eglington. On 22 June 1898, he was baptised at St Mary Magdalene Church in Worcester. By 1901, the family were living at 9 Sweetman Street, Wolverhampton, along with Charles’s baby sister Hilda May. They had moved to Noel House, 16 St Judes Road, Wolverhampton, by 1911, and Charles had gained a brother, Cecil Jack. Charles was taught at Tiffins School, Kingston-on-Thames, and later was a pupil at the Higher Grade School in Wolverhampton. He later worked for Sunbeam Motor Car Company.

At the age of only 16, he joined the Army shortly after the outbreak of war, enlisting with the Royal Field Artillery as a Gunner (number 681615) under his middle name, Leslie. Despite his youth, he showed great bravery, and the captain of his battery described, in a letter to his parents, how “On one occasion, when one of the detachment was badly wounded, he went out from the shelter to bring him in under very heavy shell fire.” Unfortunately, Charles (or Leslie) was killed in action on 15 October 1917. This was reported in the Express & Star on 22 October 1917 and the Midland Counties Express on 27 October 1917, by which date his parents’ address was given as Merton House, Merridale Road, Wolverhampton. He is buried at the Cement House Cemetery in Belgium, and remembered on the roll of honour of the Higher Grade School.

The archives has a School Logbook record from Graiseley School, written by Samuel Horatio William Bevon. He writes about his absence from school due to the death of his son, Lieutenant William Victor Bevon BSc. on November 17th 1917.

Bevon as a student

William Victor Bevon attended the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School, and Wolverhampton Municipal Science and Technical School in Garrick Street, where he was “Chief Student” of his year. (Birmingham Daily Post 19/11/17). He went on to The University of Birmingham where he Graduated with a degree in Engineering in Summer 1916. Sir Oliver Lodge, Vice Chancellor and Principle, described him as, “A brilliant student, one of the best we have had.”

He joined the Royal Flying Corps, and was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant, then Lieutenant, in the Special Reserve of Officers, working at the RFC Orfordness Experimental Station. (The Aeroplane4/10/16 p590). The research there was to help to give the pilots scientific and technical advantage in the war.

He died of Cardiac Failure following illness, at Ipswich Military Hospital, aged 24. He is buried at Wolverhampton Merridale Cemetery, plot 11805.

He was remembered on War Memorials at Wolverhampton Higher Grade School, Cable Street Mills (his brother Herbert Bevon who was seriously injured, but survived, is also named) and onthe Compton Road Memorial, and The University of Birmingham Memorial.

His grave was marked with a granite slab with engraving and a kerb. The family visited the cemetery to mark his centenary of his death.

The archives has a School Logbook record from Graiseley School, written by Samuel Horatio William Bevon. He writes about his absence from school due to the death of his son, Lieutenant William Victor Bevon BSc. on November 17th 1917.

Bevon as a student

William Victor Bevon attended the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School, and Wolverhampton Municipal Science and Technical School in Garrick Street, where he was “Chief Student” of his year. (Birmingham Daily Post 19/11/17). He went on to The University of Birmingham where he Graduated with a degree in Engineering in Summer 1916. Sir Oliver Lodge, Vice Chancellor and Principle, described him as, “A brilliant student, one of the best we have had.”

He joined the Royal Flying Corps, and was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant, then Lieutenant, in the Special Reserve of Officers, working at the RFC Orfordness Experimental Station. (The Aeroplane4/10/16 p590). The research there was to help to give the pilots scientific and technical advantage in the war.

He died of Cardiac Failure following illness, at Ipswich Military Hospital, aged 24. He is buried at Wolverhampton Merridale Cemetery, plot 11805.

He was remembered on War Memorials at Wolverhampton Higher Grade School, Cable Street Mills (his brother Herbert Bevon who was seriously injured, but survived, is also named) and on the Compton Road Memorial, and The University of Birmingham Memorial.

His grave was marked with a granite slab with engraving and a kerb. The family visited the cemetery to mark his centenary of his death.

John Edward Blakemore

The son of Councillor Edwin and Ann Blakemore, John was born in Wolverhampton in 1881. He attended the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School. In 1901, he was living with his parents at 7-10 Salop Street, Wolverhampton, along with siblings Charles, Walter, Beatrice, Annie, and Agnes. He was an electric metallurgist. By 1911, he was living at 23 The Cedars, Paget Road, Wolverhampton, with his widowed mother, Ann, and sister, Agnes Mary. John was an Electro-plater (General). For a couple of years he was captain of the Old Wulfrunians Football Club. In 1911 John enlisted in the Wolverhampton Battery North Midland Royal Field Artillery (T.F.). He resigned from the force in April 1914, but volunteered again for active service when war broke out, becoming a Lieutenant.

He was promoted to Captain in August 1915, and then Major in April 1917, being put in charge of a Royal Field Artillery Brigade. He was twice mentioned in despatches. After the British victory on the Menin Road, his family received news that he had been dangerously wounded, and he died on 5 October 1917, one hundred years ago today. Had he lived another week, he would have been entitled to the six months’ home duty granted to officers who have served continuously at the front for two years and over without sick leave. On his death, the value of his effects was £1180 11s. The Express & Star carried the story of his death on 8 October 1917. On 19 April 1918, the same newspaper announced that he had been posthumously awarded the Military Cross for the following services:

SOMME OFFENSIVE, 1916

For continuous excellent service whilst in command of 43rd Battery, R.F.A. Has been most successful in spotting active hostile trench mortars and in silencing them. Has frequently cut wire with success whilst observing from difficult positions. His reports on hostile fire and intelligence generally are most reliable and of great value. He has trained his Howitzer Battery to a high state of efficiency, and fought it with marked success.”

John is remembered at the Chocques Military Cemetery in France and is commemorated on the war memorial of the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School.

Harry Leonard Higgs

Harry was born in Penn in 1889, the son of Charles and Jane Higgs. In 1901 they were living at 226 Trysull Road, Bradmore, along with Harry’s siblings Florence, Charles A., Elsie, Blanch [sic] V. and May. By 1911, he was boarding in the home of Albert William Stubbs at 18 St Nicholas Street, Coventry. Harry was an electrician for a silk manufacturer.

Harry enlisted with the 5th (City of London) Battalion (London Rifle Brigade) (service number 510). He rose to become a Second Lieutenant, but he was killed in action on 25 March 1918. He is commemorated at the Arras Memorial. He presumably attended the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School, as he is also commemorated on their memorial, as well as on St Phillip’s Memorial in Penn.

Raymond Tom Daniels

Raymond was born in Wolverhampton on 30 October 1895, the son of George Harry Daniels (1861 – 1952) and Mary Elizabeth (Holmes) (1865 – 1943). His father worked as a cashier with the Wolverhampton Council Municipal rates department. Raymond attended the Higher Grade School, the Wolverhampton Grammar School, and the Harper-Adams College, near Newport. At the latter he received diplomas with honours in agricultural subjects. In 1901, they were at 155 Broad Lane, Victoria Terrace, Penn, and by 1911, he was living with his parents at 65 Finchfield Road, along with his sister, Helena Margaret. He later worked for the Land Valuation Office, Dudley district.

When war broke out, he enlisted with the 1st/6th South Staffordshire Regiment (number 3024), and was wounded at the Hohenzollern Redoubt on 13 October 1915. He rose from Private to being Captain, and was later wounded at the front again, before he was transferred to the Trench Mortar Batteries. According to an article in the Express & Star on 21 October 1918, he was awarded the Military Medal, as follows:

Four mortars of his battery were barraging during a raid by the infantry. Several minutes after zero a heavy bombardment of the area in which the mortars were in action commenced, many shells falling very close to the open position of the mortars. It was largely due to the excellent example and forceful direction of this officer that the mortars kept up their rate of fire under exceedingly difficult conditions.

The London Gazette citation stated he hadbeen awarded the Military Medal “for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while in command of a trench mortar battery.”

Raymond survived the war, marrying Mary Hartill (1898-1986) on 28 Jan 1920 at Codsall, Wolverhampton. From 1922, he was a Major in the Indian Army, and the couple had a son, Guy Legge Raymond Daniels (1922-1938). who was born in India, went to Wellington, and died on Christmas Day of polio. Raymond himself died on 10 February 1969 at Midhurst, Sussex.

Thomas Claude Killin

Thomas was born in Wolverhampton in 1894, the son of James and Sarah Ann Killin. In 1911 he was living with his parents at 244 Newhampton Road, together with sisters Bessie Goldie, Janet, Madeline Grace and Phyllis Mary, and brothers Harry and Allan Montgomerie. Thomas was a clerk with the London and North Western Railway.

Thomas enlisted with the Royal Fusiliers (number PS/6915), first entering the war on 14 November 1915. According to his medal card, he died of wounds on 11 November 1916, but I have been unable to find him on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission site, even with variations on the spelling of his surname. His death was registered in Lambeth in December 1916, and his name was included in a list of men who died in the Express & Star on 18 November 1916. He may be the “C. Killin” listed on the memorial of the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School.

Arthur Molineaux Cullwick

Arthur was born in Wolverhampton in 1892, the son of Josiah Frank and Jane Hannah Cullwick. In both 1901 and 1911, they were living at 31 Oaklands Road, Wolverhampton, together with Arthur’s brothers Frank William and Albert Edward, sisters Elsie Mabel, Gladys, and Annie, and a servant, Elsie Case. He attended Wolverhampton Grammar School, and by 1911, Arthur was training to be an accountant, being articled to Edgar Jordan. Later he worked for Campbell and Jordan, chartered accountants of Lichfield Street, Wolverhampton.

He volunteered for service in 1914, but was rejected several times before he passed into the army on 3 January 1917. He joined the 11th Battalion of the Cheshire Regiment (number 50795). On 1 August 1917 he was wounded, and became dangerously ill. His parents visited him in France, and there were hopes of his recovery, but he died as a result of the wounds on 20 September 1917. His death was announced in the Express & Star on 22 September 1917. On 24 January 1918, Arthur’s effects were sent on to his father, as follows:

  • 4 Identity Discs
  • Letters
  • 1 pipe
  • 1 pocket book
  • 1 cigarette case
  • 1 linen bag
  • 1 wrist watch
  • 2 combs
  • 1 mirror
  • 1 handkerchief

A memorial scroll was sent on to his father in 1920, although it had to be amended as Arthur’s middle name had been spelled incorrectly. The family were also meant to receive a plaque, which Mr Cullwick chased up on 20 November 1920, saying “I shall be glad to have same at your early convenience.” It is not clear whether the plaque ever arrived.

Arthur is buried at the Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport, France. He is also commemorated on the memorials of Darlington Street Methodist Church, the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School and St Bartholomew’s Church, Penn.

Evan Evans

Evan was born in Wolverhampton in 1896, the son of Evan and Lucy Ann Evans. In 1901 they were at 220 Lea Road, In 1911 they were living at 1 Burleigh Road, Wolverhampton, together with Evan’s siblings Eunice, Charlie, Kathleen and George Llewellyn. Evan was a telegraph messenger student, working for the Wolverhampton Post Office.

Evan enlisted with the London Regiment (Post Office Rifles), and became a Lance-Corporal (number 3419). He first served in France on 18 August 1915. He was attached to a bombing party and, according to an article in the Express & Star dated 19 May 1917, “was conspicuous for his many acts of bravery and devotion to duty. In July 1916, his bravery in the field earned him the Military Medal. He was later wounded, and died in hospital on 24 September 1916. He is buried at the Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension on the Somme. He is also remembered on the roll of honour of the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School, which he presumably attended.

Samuel Jones

Samuel was born in Wolverhampton in 1893, the son of Emmanuel and Kezia Jones. Emmanuel died in 1898, so by 1901 Samuel was living with his widowed mother and siblings Kezia, Annie and Alfred at 72 Oxford Street, Wolverhampton. Kezia remarried to a John Quinton in 1906, so by 1911 Samuel appeard at 1 Brunswick Street, Wolverhampton, with his mother, sisters, step-father, step-sister Eliza, and nephew, Robert Simmons. Samuel had become a wine and spirit bottler.

Samuel enlisted at Wolverhampton initially in the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 4873) and later in the 10th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment (number 39991). He died of wounds in France on 31 October 1916. He is buried at the Contay British Cemetery, as well as being commemorated on the M & B Springfield Brewery Works Memorial (which is presumably where he worked), and that of the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School, which he would have attended.

John Lyttleton Tuft

John was born in Wolverhampton in 1888, the son of Arthur John and Mary Patience Tuft. In 1891, they were living at Ash Villa, Upper Penn, together with John’s brother Frederick Arthur, sister Evelyn Patience, grandmother Elenor Woodhouse and great-aunt Sarah Tuft. They were at 24 Lord Street in 1901.

John enlisted in the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 2979), and served in France from 5 March 1915. He was killed in action on the first day of the Battle of the Somme on 1 July 1916. This was noted in the log book of the Higher Grade School on 10 July, as follows:

Hear of the death of Sergeant John L. Tuft – write to the bereaved parents of this “old boy”.

He is remembered at the Foncquevillers Military Cemetery in France, as well as on the M & B Springfield Brewery Works Memorial (so he presumably worked there at some point), the roll of honour in the Lady Chapel in St Peter’s Church, and the roll of honour for the Higher Grade School. The value of his effects were £128 2s. 8d.

Thomas Lyttleton W. Pearson

Thomas was born in Bilston in 1885, the son of James and Elizabeth Pearson. In 1891 they were living at 11 High Street, Sedgley, together with Thomas’s brothers Frederick and William, and sisters Helen, Edith and Lillie. He attended the Higher Grade School in Wolverhampton.  They were at 649 Parkfield Road, Sedgley by 1901, and Thomas had become a commercial clerk.

Thomas enlisted first in the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry (number 20121), and later became a Lance Sergeant in the 7th Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (number 28678). He died in France on 27 April 1916, and the circumstances surrounding his death are given in the log book of the Higher Grade School on 18 May 1916, as follows:Received an account of the heroic self sacrifice of Sergeant Thomas Pearson (Sedgley) of the Shropshire Light Infantry, an “Old Boy” who gave his helmet to a private who was buried in a dug-out (all but his head). Sergeant Pearson was overcome by the poison gas & taken to Hospital – where he died.

Wrote to the bereaved parents.

Thomas is remembered at the Philosophe British Cemetery in Mazingarbe, France, as well as on the roll of honour for the Higher Grade School.

Sydney/Sidney Jenkins

Sydney was born in Wolverhampton on 31 August 1888, the son of John and Emma Jenkins. In 1901 he was living with his parents at 22 Lea Road, Wolverhampton, with sisters Emma J., Winifred, and Gladys and brother John W. He attended the Higher Grade School in Wolverhampton. By 1911 he is a boarder in Byfleet, Surrey, and has become an aeronautical engineer.

In 1912 he married Evelyn May Horton in Wolverhampton. However, from 1917, he appears to have had further bigamous marriages and children, for which he eventually went to court. Further details of this aspect of his life are discussed here.

Sydney enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps on 26 June 1912 (service number 112) and was in the 1AM 5 Squadron at the outbreak of war. He was promoted to Corporal on 10 August 1914 and proceeded to France. On 9 November 1914, he was awarded the French Medaille Militaire for gallantry. The Higher Grade School log book proudly proclaimed on 20 November 1914:

This morning after prayers read of the decoration of Sergeant Sidney Jenkins, formerly a pupil here, by the French President with the Medaille Militaire, for gallantry; announcement received with acclamation by scholars.

Wrote to Sergeant Jenkins conveying him our hearty congratulations.

William Freeman Green

William Green was born in Wolverhampton in 1892, the son of Henry Freeman and Phoebe Ann Green. In 1901, they were living at No 3 Court, Littles Lane, Wolverhampton, with William’s sisters Mary Ann, Jane, Phoebe and Annie, and brothers Thomas and John. Phoebe died in 1901. By 1911, William was a general labourer for a local merchant and was living with his widowed father, and three of his siblings at 13 Cannock Road Terrace, Wolverhampton.

William enlisted at Birmingham into the 4th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment (number 12982), first entering the war in the Balkans on 25 April 1915. He was killed in action at Gallipoli. According to both the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and the Army Register of Soldiers’ Effects he was killed on 7 May 1915. However, Soldiers Died in the Great War have got his date of death as 9 October 1917; presumably this has been mixed up with another William Green. William is commemorated on the Helles Memorial as well as that for the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School, which he probably attended. His next of kin is given as his sister, Mrs. Mary Ann McNay, of 9 Westbury Street, Wolverhampton.

Hubert Piper

The son of Francis and Martha Piper, Hubert was born in Wolverhampton in 1888. In 1891 he was living at 11 Cannon Street, with his parents, brothers William, Francis, Thomas and Alfred, sisters Mary, Emma and Lily, and a boarder, Harry Williams. By 1901 they were at 12 Ward Street, Bilston, and they moved yet again to 329 Bilston Road by 1911. Hubert had become an Elementary School teacher for the City Council (according to the census – presumably this means Wolverhampton Council, which was not a City at this date, or possibly Birmingham). Hubert’s father died in 1913.

Hubert became a Private in the 1st/8th Territorial Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (number 305452). He was killed in action on 1 July 1916. He is commemorated on the following

Gilbert Harry Wadams

Gilbert Wadams was born in Wolverhampton in 1896, the son of John Riley Wadams and Wilhelmina Adelaide Smith. In 1901 he appeared at No 1 Stanley Villas, Jeffcock Road, Wolverhampton, with his parents, brothers Fred and Reggie, and sisters Wilhelmina, Carry, Irene V., Florence, Ida H. and Violet M. His father died in 1903 at the age of 48, but the family were at the same address in 1911.

Gilbert became a Private in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (number 305667) but was killed in action on 1 July 1916. He is commemorated on the Roll of Honour for Wolverhampton Higher Grade School (so presumably he was a pupil here), as well as on the war memorial for St Chad and St Mark’s Church.

Edward John Nicholls

Edward Nicholls was born in Wolverhampton in 1895, the son of William and Elizabeth Nicholls. In 1901 they were living at 7 Dudley Road, together with Edward’s brothers Frederick and Victor and sister Alice. Edward attended the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School. His father was the proprietor of the timber merchants John Nicholls and Sons.

Edward joined the O. T. C. Artists’ Rifles in November 1915, and became Second-Lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in July 1916. A report in the Express & Star dated 27 November 1917 hails the fact that he has been awarded the Military Cross for bravery in the field, although I have been unable to find his citation in the London Gazette. Edward survived the war and married in 1921, and went on to have four children – John, Sylvia, Joan and Barrie – between 1934 and 1946. Edward died in Wolverhampton in 1970.

Percy George Birch

This poster dating from 1920 is part of our collections at Wolverhampton Archives. As well as depicting various memorials and listing various significant First World War battles, the piece of paper in the middle commemorates the following:

BIRCH, Lce. Cpl. Percy George, 1635. 1st/4th Bn. Oxf. and Bucks Light Inf. 24th Aug., 1916. Age 24. Son of Calvin and Gertrude Edith E. Mason Birch, of 87 Darlington St., Wolverhampton.

Percy was born in Wolverhampton in 1892, and must have attended the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School. By 1901, the family were already at 87 Darlington Street, and the household consisted of his parents (his mother called Charlotte here), sisters Gertrude, Mable and Amy, and brothers Roland, William and Chas. They were at the same address in 1911, and the household now consisted of Percy and his parents (his mother in this instance called Charlotte Alice), sister Amy, and brothers Roland John, William Henry, Charles Norman and Laurence Calvin. By this date, Percy had become a student teacher.

Percy enlisted in the 1st/4th Battalion of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry (number 1635). He died on 24 August 1916. The explanation for the different mother’s names is that Percy’s biological mother, Charlotte,  died in 1917, and his father remarried Gertrude E. E. M. Hardiman in 1920. Percy is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial in France, as well as on the roll of honour in the Lady Chapel of St Peter’s Church and the memorial for old pupils of the Higher Grade School. He also appears on the memorial in St Peter’s Church.

Arthur Reginald Martin

Arthur Martin was born in Wolverhampton in 1898, the son of Arthur and Florence Martin. In 1901 they were living at “Ivanhoe”, Hordern Road, together with Arthur’s grandmother, Hannah Cockerill. Arthur attended the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School. At some point he must have worked for Mander Brothers Ltd paint and varnish works.

He enlisted in the 5th Battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales’s Own) (number 52307). He died on 20 July 1918, and is commemorated at the Soissons Memorial. He also appears on memorials from the Higher Grade School and Mander Brothers Ltd.

Joseph Caddick

Joseph Caddick was born in Burton-upon-Trent in 1888, the son of Elisha and Mary Ann Caddick (nee Green). By 1901 they had moved to Ettingshall and were living at 645 Parkfield Road. Joseph and his parents were joined by a servant, Charlotte Wilkinson. They were at the same address in 1911, by which date Joseph had become a baker and grocer like his father. Their servant was Bertha Wilkinson, presumably a relation of Charlotte.

Joseph Caddick enlisted in the 8th Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 31873). Joseph was killed in action on 23 April 1917, although it appears that he may have been missing for a while, as the Army Register of Soldier’s Effects states his date of death followed by “presumed for official purposes”. His next of kin is given as his mother, Mary A. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, as well as on the Roll of Honour of Queen Street Congregational Church, Wolverhampton, and that of the Higher Grade School David Percival Tempest

David Percival Tempest was born in West Derby in 1880. His family moved to Wolverhampton, and he attended both St Peter’s and the Higher Grade Schools. In the 1901 census he was living with his mother, Harriett, his sisters Nellie and Stella, and a visitor (Alfred Jones), a boarder (H. Ryeland Leigh) and a servant (Elizabeth Smith) at 39 Melbourne Street. By this date he was a warehouse clerk, and he worked for 14 years for Meynell and Sons, Montrose Street. He married Lily Ann Fowler in 1910, and they went on to have a daughter, Marjorie, in 1911.

David served as a Company Quartermaster-Sergeant with the South Staffordshire Regiment. He served in Ireland and was killed in Dublin during the Irish Rebellion on 29 April 1916. An article on him appeared in the Midland Counties Express on 6 January 1917. He is buried at the Grangegorman Military Cemetery in Ireland, and commemorated on the Higher Grade School Roll of Honour.

Sidney Edward Dain

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission website entry for SE Dain records

Rank: Second Lieutenant

Date of Death: 07/12/1918

Regiment/Service: Royal Engineers Postal Sect,.

Grave Reference: V. E. 39.

Cemetery: Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension.

Wolverhampton Higher Grade School Memorial, and Wolverhampton Area Postal Workers Memorial, both have this information too.

A search for military records, found only his Medal Index Card, showing that he joined service as a Corporal, Regimental number 27769, before promotion to Second Lieutenant. There is also a small entry recording “Died 7/12/18 (Flue) [sic]”.

Three large hospitals were stationed at Abbeville in WW1, and it was the Head Quarters of the Commonwealth lines of communication, so Sidney Dain succumbed to influenza, and was possibly admitted to hospital, near to where he was stationed. His death occurred after Germany signed the Armistice on 11th November 1918.

His Medal Card also records  “OIC Recs (Officer in Charge Records) forwards Application for Clasp for Mrs SE Dain in respect of her late husband 5/5/20. Widows address Mrs Dain 29 Paget Road Wolverhampton.”

Information about the Postal Section of the Royal Engineers is that they performed an important role. This operation was controlled by the GPO, and apparently even questions in Parliament about forces mail were answered by the Postmaster General, and not the War Minister. At its peak during the war the GPO was dealing with an extra 12 million letters and a million parcels being sent to soldiers each week. The article headed “How did 12 million letters a week reach soldiers?” , dated 31 January 2014, explains this.

Sidney Edward Dain was baptised at St Marks Church on June 9th 1889, his parents being Herbert, a Boot Clicker, and Christabella, of 29 Mander St. His birth was registered at Wolverhampton in the quarter ended June 1889. At the time of the 1891 census the family lived at 29 Mander Street and consisted of Herbert age 36, Boot Clicker, Christabella age 38 born at Pontesbury Shropshire (the other members of the family were all born at Wolverhampton) and their 4 sons Herbert J Dain age 12, Frederick A Dain age 8, Ernest C Dain age 3, and Sidney age 1, the 3 older boys all “Scholars.”

By 1901 the family, still living at 29 Mander Street, was Herbert, age 46, a Rent Collector, his wife Christabella age 48, Herbert J Dain age 22, Leather Merchants Assistant, Frederick A Dain age 18, Accounts Clerk, Ernest C Dain age 13 Hardware Factors Warehouse Boy, and Sidney age 11. The 1911 census shows the family living at 15 Lea Road. Herbert now age 56 still works as a Rent Collector, Christabella is age 58, Ernest Christopher age 23 is working as a Carpenter and Joiner employed by a Builder, and Sidney Edward, age 21  is a Sorting Clerk and Telegraphist working, for the Post Office – significant in view of his subsequent Army Service.

Sidney Dain’s marriage to Gertrude E Reed was registered at Wolverhampton in the second quarter of 1915. The birth of Sidney J Dain, mother’s maiden name Reed, was registered at Wolverhampton in the quarter ended June 1919. This was Sidney Edward Dain’s son, who, sadly, would have never known his father

John Evans

John Evans was born in Wolverhampton in around 1889. Given his common name, there are a couple of possibilities for him in the 1901 census (using the other information we have about him). He is either the 12-year old John Evans living at 12 Dixon Street (with parents John and Maria, brothers Harry and Percy, sisters Clara, Lilly and Maud, and a boarder Charlie Wright) or the 11-year old John Joseph Evans at 13 Boscobel Place (with parents John and Lydia Elizabeth, brothers Arthur and Francis W., and sister Clara).

In 1907, he enlisted with the 1st Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment (number 8498) and rose to become Lance Corporal. During the course of his service he was twice stationed in Africa and once in Gibraltar. On 28 October 1914 he tried to rescue a wounded officer “who lay in a dangerous position”, and was killed himself. An article in the Express & Star dated 13 February 1915 described these circumstances. His father, Mr J. J. Evans, of 1a Red Hill Street, off Stafford Street, had received a postcard from his son’s sergeant, who himself had been wounded and lay in a Bournemouth hospital. John Evans is commemorated a the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. He may also appear on the memorial of the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School (where there is a “J. Evans”).

William Waterhouse Hawkesford

Midland Counties Express, 10 Mar 1917

Additional information, alongside a photograph, appears about William Waterhouse Hawkesford in the Midland Counties Express on 10 March 1917. He was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs G. Hawkesford. He enlisted in the army on 27 August 1914, on his 20th birthday. He had been educated at the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School, where he passed the Oxford Local exam with honours. He became a clerk at the Rees Roturbo Company. When he was killed in action on 1 July 1916 he had been at the front for 14 months.

Four Brothers Serving King and Country

Express & Star 6 Jan 1916

An article in the Express & Star on 6 January 1916 proudly proclaims that four sons of Mrs Awksford of 21 Lewis Street, Wolverhampton were serving King and Country as soldiers, as follows:

  • Robert aged 17 was in training, having joined the Royal Field Artillery in September 1915
  • William, aged 21, had joined the 18th Hussars at the beginning of the war and was serving in France
  • Joseph, aged 18, was with the 2nd South Staffordshire Regiment. He had been wounded in May 1915 and was in hospital for five months
  • Howard, aged 20, was in the 1/5th South Staffords and had moved to work in munitions.

Tracking these brothers down has proved more difficult, not least because the Express & Star appears to have printed their name wrong. I finally managed to ascertain that their surname was in fact Hawkesford, with further information as follows:

  • Robert Hawkesford, born 12 April 1898 in Wolverhampton, became Acting Serjeant, regiment number 100762. He married Alice Mitchell in Wolverhampton in 1924, and they went on to have two daughters, Joyce and Mary. He died in 1969.
  • William Waterhouse Hawkesford, born 1894 in Solihull, was later killed in action on 1 July 1916, aged 21. He was the son of Mrs. Harriet Mary Hawkesford (nee Richardson), of 21, Levis Street, Penn Road, Wolverhampton. At the time of his death he was in the 1st Batallion of the Hampshire Regiment (number 16823), and he is commemorated at the Redan Ridge Cemetery No 2, Beaumont, France. He is also listed on theRoll of Honour of the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School, which presumably the brothers attended.
  • Joseph Vincent Hawkesford, born 24 January 1897 in Aston, regiment number 9180. He was taken prisoner in Delville Wood on 31 August 1916. He had been injured by grenades on his right arm and side, and was taken to thePrisoner of War Camp at Burgsteinfurt. After the war, he was one of the returning prisoners who were invited to a dinner organised by the Express & Star in March 1919.
  • Howard Hawkesford, born 1895 in Aston. He married Emily Cable in Newcastle upon Tyne in 1916, and the couple had five children – Eleanor, Doris, William, Joyce and Howard – between 1917 and 1929.

Graham Gardner

Wolverhampton Chronicle 20 October 1915

According to the article that appeared in the Wolverhampton Chronicle on 20 October 1915, Graham Gardner was a prominent sportsman in Wolverhampton. Whilst at the Higher Grade School he competed in school swimming championships in 1907 and 1908, along with Wolverhampton championships. He also played for a number of seasons with Old Church Football Club.

He enlisted in the 3rd Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment in August 1914. During his training he was promoted to sergeant, but in order to get to the Front sooner he relinquished a stripe to join the 2nd Battalion. His actions on the field soon earned him promotion to sergeant again. He was killed in action on 25 September 1915, ordering his men to “Follow the officers.” According to the article, he was 22 years of age, but I have been unable to find a record of his birth, presumably because of the various possible spellings of his name. Two photographs of him with his football team (including one photograph taken at the rear of our building, the Molineux Hotel), feature in Roy Hawthorne & Jim Dowdall’s book, Images of Wolverhampton, although no further details about him are included. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial in France.

Richard Thomas Ivens

Not originally from Wolverhampton, Richard Thomas Ivens was born in West Bromwich in 1894, to parents Richard Edmund and Annie Matilda Ivens (nee Griffiths). In the 1901 census the family were living at 109 Pargeter Street in Walsall, together with Richard’s sister, Mary. By 1911, they had moved to Wolverhampton, and were at 68 Park Road South, Blakenhall, together with a cousin, William Joseph Leslie Hyall. Ivens became a chemical manufacturing clerk. Later, the family moved to 15 Allen Road.

Richard enlisted in the 1st/6th South Staffordshire Regiment (number 3036), and first fought in France in March 1915. On 2 July 1916, Richard died of his wounds, aged 22. He is commemorated at the Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, Saulte, in France. He is also listed on the memorial of the Higher Grade School and the Newhampton Road Wesleyan Church Memorial.

Gallant Ettingshall Officer Wounded

Article in the Express & Star 11 April 1918

This report appeared in the Express & Star on 11 April 1918, about Captain J. A. Pinnegar, M. C., Rifle Brigade, stating that he was “wounded and missing”. He was the son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Pinnegar of Frost Street, Ettingshall. The couple were informed by the Commanding Officer of the battalion that “your son is a prisoner in the hands of the Germans; he was also wounded.”

John Arthur Pinnegar was born in Wolverhampton in 1890. He appears in the 1891 census at Frost Street, together with his parents Thomas and Alice, his five brothers (William, Frank, Percy, Frederick and Walter) and two sisters, Beatrice and Amy. By 1901 they are registered at 27 Frost Street, with Frank, Percy, Frederick, Walter and Amy still living there, along with an additional daughter, Edith. John attended the Higher Grade School, and then worked at Briton Motor Works. In 1911 they are at 22 Frost Street and John is listed as an Under Manager. His brothers Frank and Percy, and sisters Amy and Edith, are still living with the family.

In 1914, Pinnegar was mobilised as a motor transport driver in the A. S. C. and became a holder of the Mons Star. In 1917 he received a commission in the 16th Battalion of the Rifle Brigade, and was later slightly wounded, when he won his Military Cross. In his letter, the Commanding Officer of the battalion consoles the couple by adding that “at the end of the war, which is now not far distant, he will return safe and sound.” Unfortunately, his words did not hold true. By the time this article appeared, Captain Pinnegar was already dead, as he had died on 23 March 1918. He is commemorated on the Poizieres Memorial in France.

Staff Sister Bertha Mary Cooksley

The very detailed logbook kept by the headteacher of the Higher Grade School in Newhampton Road noted that he had read in the Express & Star newspaper of the decoration of one of the school’s former female pupils, a Bertha Mary Cooksley. This enabled me to find the article, and to delve a bit deeper into the background of this woman.

Bertha Mary Cooksley was born in Taunton in 1885 and, according to the article, she was the daughter of Mr A. Cooksley. At some point the family clearly moved to Wolverhampton, as they were living at 156 Lea Road during the War and Bertha had attended the Higher Grade School.

After leaving school, she started her nursing training at the Queen’s Hospital in Birmingham in 1910, and, soon after the start of the War, she became a staff sister on the 1st Southern General Hospital in Dudley Road, Birmingham. The article in the Express & Star, dated 5 June 1916, tells of ten nurses at Birmingham hospitals who were awarded “the decoration of the Royal Red Cross in recognition of their services in connection with the war.” Bertha was one of these nurses.

Bertha married a George C. Corbett in Wolverhampton in 1919, and the couple had one child, Catherine, born in Birmingham in 1921. So far I have been unable to confirm the details of Bertha’s death.

Frederick Hubert Austin

Originally born in 1899 in Chelmsford, in Essex, Frederick Hubert Austin was educated at the Higher Grade School in Wolverhampton, hence he is included on our blog.

His parents were Frederick North Austin and Sarah Ellen Austin (nee Hawkins). In 1901 he was living at 123 Angel Lane Bridge, West Ham, with his parents as well as his father’s brother, William Edgar Austin. By 1911 the family had moved to Springfield Villas, 70 New Town Road, Bishops Stortford, Hertfordshire. Frederick’s father was listed as an insurance agent, originally from Bilston.

In February 1915, Frederick enlisted in the South Staffordshire Regiment, by which point the family had moved again to 2275, Coleman Street in Wolverhampton. His medal card indicates that he was later transferred to the 1st Battalion of the Essex Regiment, where he became a Second Lieutenant. Poor Frederick died a day after Armistice Day on 12 November 1918 of pneumonia while in Rest Camp at Cherboug. He was only 19 years old. He is buried in the Tourlaville Communal Cemetery and Extension in France.

Joseph Horace Belcher

Notice in memory of Privates Joseph Horace Belcher and Ernest Haden Elliot

This notice was produced by Wolverhampton Free Library after the death of two of their Library Assistants  on 27 September 1917, Joseph Horace Belcher and Ernest Haden Elliott.

Belcher was born in 1896 to Joseph and Mary Ann Belcher, of 247 All Saints Road, Wolverhampton. He attended the Wolverhampton Higher Grade School. By the 1911 census he was an errand boy at an ironmonger’s shop, but later became a Library Assistant at Wolverhampton Free Library. He enlisted on 7 October 1914 in the North Midland Field Ambulance Section of the Royal Army Medical Corps as a Private (service number 421194). He received the Victory Medal and the British Medal.He was killled on the Western Front in France, part of the British Expeditionary Force there, and is buried at Tyne Cot in West Vlanderen, Belgium. Belcher is commemorated on three war memorials in Wolverhampton, that of the Higher Grade School in Newhampton Road, the Royal Army Medical Corps Transport Memorial in St Peter’s Church and All Saints Church War Memorial. There was also a poem, written by Arthur Saunders, published in the Express and Star on 23 October 1917. The Royal Army Medical Corps also have an entry for him on their website.

Poem dedicated to Belcher and Elliott

Belcher’s watch was not amongst items sent back to the family, and they received a watch that did not belong to him. The commander of Belcher’s unit states that “No personal effects of this man were handed over to this Unit. I believe he was killed in No Man’s land.” It appears, however, that the watch was eventually tracked down, as there is a postcard dated 1 May 1918 from Mr Belcher, thanking the Royal Army Medical Corps for the return of the watch.

Daniel Sampson Onions

Daniel was born in Bridgnorth in 1897, the son of Samuel Thomas and Phoebe Onions. By 1901, they were living at 9 Beacon Street, Sedgley, with Daniel’s brothers James Beaconsfield, John Arthur Balfour, Samuel Thomas, Charles Henry and George Frederick. By 1911 they were at 152 Caledonian Street, Wolverhampton, and Daniel had two additional siblings, Phoebe Sarah and Joseph Edwin. Daniel attended the Higher Grade and Technical Schools in Wolverhampton.

On 22 June 1915, he enlisted with the Royal Engineers (service number 103777). He became a Wireless Operator Learner, and was later a Pioneer and then a Sapper. By June 1915, his trade was clerk. He qualified as a Proficient Telegraphist on 19 May 1916. He served both at home and with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force with the Wireless Section at Giza. On 9 February 1918 he was sent home from hospital as being no longer physically fit for war service following sickness, and was discharged on 2 March 1918. On 16 February 1918 he was issued with a Silver War Badge (number 336114).

Daniel married Alice Lawley in Aston in 1918, and the couple had four sons – Raymond (1919 in Aston), Kenneth (1921), Maurice G. (1923) and Malcolm S. (1931) – the latter three being born in Wolverhampton. Daniel died at St George’s Hospital, Stafford, on 29 July 1965, by which date his address was 6 Vauxhall House, Vauxhall Avenue, Wolverhampton. The value of his effects was £289.

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